YOU MUST SEE
Europe's Most Controversial Play !!
U.S. Premiere !!
La MaMa presents a Ronald Rand production

“WE COULDN'T CALL IT WHAT WE WANTED TO CALL IT, SO WE CALLED IT
HOLY CRAP !!”

by Iñigo Ramirez de Haro

Stephen Mo Hanan in Holy Crap

starring Tony Award nominee Stephen Mo Hanan*
directed by ERICA GOULD

April 28 - May 15, 2011 at La MaMa

*Appears courtesy of Actors Equity Association. An AEA Approved Showcase.

Tickets $18 / Seniors & Students $!3
GET TICKETS AT WWW.LAMAMA.ORG

“It bowled me over! Iñigo Ramirez de Haro is Arrabal, Artaud,
and Lorca rolled into one.”  -- John Guare

“People don’t talk about anything else!”… Carmen Pasadas, “La Razón” Spain
“Caustic, wild and disrupting!”… Audre Bedy, “L’humanité” France
A spiritual catharsis… A purification metaphor!”… Patricia Cordero, “Reforma” Mexico
Utterly sarcastic!”… Carlos Paul, “La Jornada” Mexico
A liberating ritual of purification!”… Verónica Díaz, “Milenio” Mexico
Roars with laughter!”… Cristina Tamariz, “El Universal” Mexico
“Ironic, subtle and rich!”… Maria Francisca Seabra, “Woman” Portugal
Orgasmic!  Controversial!”… Sofia Canelas de Castro, “Correio de Manha”Portugal
A provocative meditation on religion!”… Maria Joao Caetano, “Diario de Noticias” Portugal

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VIDEO

A video of the attack

 

La MaMa will present a Ronald Rand production beginning previews April 28.    Opening night is slated for April 29. Performances through May 15th Wed-Sat at 7:30 PM, Sunday at 2:30 PM

La MaMa (First Floor Theater), 74A East Fourth Street, East Village
Tickets $18.00, $13 Students/Seniors.  Box office (212) 475-7710    lamama.org

Originally titled Me cago en Dios (an often-used Spanish colloquialism that translates literally as “I Sh*t on God”) the U. S. Premiere is translated by Ronald Rand and Iñigo Ramirez de Haro. The site-specific production will be directed by Erica Gould utilizing a series of non-traditional spaces within the La MaMa arts complex.

The production team includes Stephen Dobay (sets), Driscoll Otto (lighting), Kevin Thacker (costumes), and Scott O'Brien (composer/sound design).

In WE COULDN'T CALL IT WHAT WE WANTED TO CALL IT, SO WE CALLED IT HOLY CRAP !!,  a man appeals for relief from his constipation,  both mental and physical. In finding a way of coping with his discomfort, he is forced to relive the traumatic experiences of his youth. Ultimately, this caustic comedy explores religious indoctrination, sexuality, mysticism, and pedophilia in the Church.

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PRESS

theatermania

THEATERMANIA.COM

 Theater News  

Stephen Mo Hanan* to Star in ...Holy Crap!! at La MaMa

By: Dan Bacalzo · Apr 6, 2011 · New York

Stephen Mo Hanan

Stephen Mo Hanan

Tony Award nominee Stephen Mo Hanan will star in Spanish playwright Inigo Ramirez de Haro's We Couldn't Call It What We Wanted to Call It, So We Called It Holy Crap!!, to play La MaMa E.T.C., April 28-May 15. Translated by Ronald Rand & Inigo Ramirez de Haro, Erica Gould will direct this site-specific production that utilizes a series of non-traditional spaces within the La MaMa arts complex.

In the piece, a man appeals for relief from his constipation, both mental and physical. In finding a way of coping with his discomfort, he is forced to relive the traumatic experiences of his youth. Ultimately, this caustic comedy explores religious indoctrination, sexuality, mysticism, and pedophilia in the Church.

Hanan received a Tony nomination for his work in the Broadway production of Cats. Additional Main Stem credits include The Pirates of Penzance and Peter Pan. Off-Broadway, he co-authored and starred in Jolson & Company.

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THE NEW YORK TIMES

ARTS BRIEFING

By Lawrence Van Gelder
Published: May 04, 2004

THEATER: MAYHEM IN MADRID -- Chaos engulfed a Madrid play with an unprintable title in mid performance on Sunday night when a young spectator, shouting, ''Long live Christ the king,'' tried to torch the set and was tackled by the lead actor and the playwright and defended by a second spectator before the audience realized that the turmoil was not part of the entertainment, The Guardian of London reported. The play by Iñigo Ramírez de Haro, in which the protagonist argues that religion, like tobacco and alcohol, should be prohibited to minors, had attracted criticism from church officials and politicians since its opening a week and a half earlier. After the attackers were subdued with the help of members of the audience and held for arrest, the play's director, Pedro Forero, said, ''At no point in this production have we had any intention of offending anyone.'' Intentions or not, the archbishop of Madrid, calling for an immediate closing of the play, said, ''It's an offense against the most treasured values and beliefs.''

MADRID

Catholic zealots leap from audience to break up performance of blasphemous play

By Juliane von Reppert-Bismarck
Monday, 3 May 2004

Theatregoers at one of Madrid's most venerable arts centres became unwitting witnesses to religious violence last weekend when irate zealots broke up a performance of the play In God we shit.

Theatregoers at one of Madrid's most venerable arts centres became unwitting witnesses to religious violence last weekend when irate zealots broke up a performance of the play In God we shit.

Shouting "Viva Cristo Rey," two men launched themselves from the audience at the Circulo de Bellas Artes and beat up the actor and playwright of Me cago en Dios, directed by Pedro Forero, which for the past week had been making headlines in Spain for its blasphemous title and anti-clerical content.

"They beat us, they destroyed the music equipment, and they tried to set fire to the set, which is made of loo paper," said the playwright, Iñigo Ramírez de Haro. "The audience thought it was part of the play so no one helped us for ages."

Ramírez de Haro and the actor Fernando Incera were treated for sprains and bruises. Police arrested the two young men, one of whom is said to serve with the armed forces. Their shouts translated as "Long live Christ the King", but are also a rallying call to the conservative Catholic Cristo Rey movement.

Controversy about the humorous monologue has raged since it opened 10 days ago. Set in a bathroom, it features a constipated man who muses about violence and abuses suffered at the hands of clerics during a childhood at a Jesuit school.

The title translates as "I shit on God," an expression Spaniards utter commonly in anger or amazement. But when the playwright wrote the largely autobiographical work for a political theatre festival in New York last summer, he gave it the English title In God we shit.

Madrid's archbishop has demanded the play be banned. The president of Madrid's regional government - Esperanza Aguirre, the playwright's sister-in-law - last week wrote to the arts centre, urging its director to rethink its programme. Many view the letter as a veiled threat to withdraw funding from the centre.

Madrileños say local conservative politicians are reinforcing the power of the Catholic church and depleting the capital of its artistic diversity.

"Sell me a ticket. I don't care if I have to stand," one leather-clad Madrileño told centre employees hours before the play's final showing yesterday. "I don't care about the play. I'm here to support artists against the religious freaks who rule this city."

The play will open in Paris in August. Other performances are planned in Italy and Argentina.

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  OFF OFF BROADWAY WORLD.COM

La MaMa Presents HOLY CRAP !!
April 28-May 15


by BWW News Desk

La_MaMa_Presents_HOLY_CRAP_20010101Europe's Most Controversial Play Makes U.S. Premiere
La MaMa Presents a Ronald Rand Production "WE COULDN'T CALL IT WHAT WE WANTED TO CALL IT, SO WE CALLED IT HOLY CRAP !!" ** starring Tony Award nominee Stephen Mo Hanan* - April 28 - May 15 at La MaMa

"It bowled me over! Inigo Ramirez de Haro is Arrabal, Artaud, and Lorca rolled into one." -- John Guare

After acclaimed productions in Madrid, Mexico City, Paris, and Lisbon as well as generating almost unprecedented controversy, Spanish playwright Inigo Ramirez de Haro's WE COULDN'T CALL IT WHAT WE WANTED TO CALL IT, SO WE CALLED IT HOLY CRAP !! will make its U.S. Premiere starring Tony Award nominee Stephen Mo Hanan (Cats, Jolson).

La MaMa
will present this Ronald Rand production beginning previews April 28, running through May 15, Performances are Wednesday - Saturday at 7:30 PM, Sunday at 2:30 PM. Running time is 65 minutes. La MaMa is located at 74A East Fourth Street (between 2nd Avenue & Bowery-- accessible from the F train at 2nd Ave).

Tickets are $18 (students/seniors $13), available at 212-475-7710 or www.lamama.org.

For more information visit www.HolyCrapThe Play.com.

Originally titled Me cago en Dios (an often-used Spanish colloquialism that translates literally as "I Sh*t on God") the U.S. Premiere is translated by Ronald Rand and Iñigo Ramirez de Haro. The site-specific production will be directed by Erica Gould utilizing a series of non-traditional spaces within the La MaMa arts complex. The production team includes Stephen Dobay (sets), Driscoll Otto (lighting), Kevin Thacker (costumes), and Scott O'Brien (composer/sound design).

In WE COULDN'T CALL IT WHAT WE WANTED TO CALL IT, SO WE CALLED IT HOLY CRAP !!, a man appeals for relief from his constipation, both mental and physical. In finding a way of coping with his discomfort, he is forced to relive the traumatic experiences of his youth. Ultimately, this caustic comedy explores religious indoctrination, sexuality, mysticism, and pedophilia in the Church.

As documented in The New York Times by Lawrence Van Gelder when the play originally opened in 2004 at Madrid's Center for Fine Arts (the biggest and most prestigious cultural center in Madrid), the play attracted criticism from church officials of many faiths and numerous politicians. The archbishop of Madrid called for an immediate closing
of the play. Thousands marched in protest and the playwright was sued by more than 3,300 people. Two protestors attacked the actor and playwright onstage and tried to burn down the set. Similar controversy
has followed every subsequent production. A video of the attack can be seen at www.ramirezdeharo.com/videos.htm, or vimeo.com/21720622.

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REVIEWS

BACKSTAGE

We Couldn't Call It What We Wanted to Call It, So We Called It Holy Crap!!
A Ronald Rand Production at La MaMa ETC


Reviewed by Jason Fitzgerald
May 05, 2011

Stephen Mo Hanna in Holy Crap

La MaMa ETC has cornered the market on theatrical refugees. A few buildings down from where the exiled Belarus Free Theatre is currently performing, La MaMa's intimate First Floor Theatre is hosting a play that was nearly banned in Madrid, where the playwright and actor were violently beaten by religious zealots. Because the original title does not translate well into English—the colloquialism "Me cago en Dios" literally means "I shit on God"—playwright Iñigo Ramírez de Haro has changed it, though apparently with reservations. La MaMa's production is ambivalently titled "We Couldn't Call It What We Wanted to Call It, So We Called It Holy Crap!!"

The production pairs a brilliant performance by Stephen Mo Hanan with the script's shatteringly precise diagnosis of the trauma of religious belief. Hanan plays an unnamed man who, he bluntly tells us, "can't take a shit!" He tries to commiserate with his audience, which is, strangely, seated in his bathroom, before succumbing to a hysterical flashback in which he relives his God-fearing childhood, full of penitence and promises of self-sacrifice. This recollection yields a deeper memory of sexual abuse at the hands of a priest.

Director Erica Gould, aided by set designer Stephen Dobay, stages the man's unconscious as a theater within a theater, a pair of nested prosceniums that are revealed as the character, as though working through psychoanalysis, digs deeper and deeper into his past. More subversive than a mere representation of Catholic guilt, the resulting topography presents sexual abuse as the repressed unconscious of the Church itself, unacknowledged and essential to its being. Ramírez de Haro sets this up by paralleling the alienation that rape victims feel from their own bodies with the corporeal denial that the Catholic deity demands.

Hanan is an unlikely choice for Ramírez de Haro's hapless, self-loathing priest. Known for playing outsized clowns, from Pseudolus to Al Jolson, he leaps into the part like a child at his favorite game. His energy brings life to a potentially dour evening, while his virtuosic range lets him move seamlessly among the play's many voices: God, the abusive priest, and others. More important, Hanan wrings poignancy from shtick, and shtick from seriousness, with a skill reminiscent of
Everett Quinton or the late Charles Ludlam. The result is a multilayered, surprising, and disturbingly familiar peek into the self-contradictory soul of the religious believer.

Presented by and at La MaMa ETC, 74A
E. Fourth St., NYC. May 5–15. Thu.–Sat., 7:30 p.m.; Sun., 2:30 p.m. (212) 352-3101, (866) 811-4111, (212) 475-7710, www.theatermania.com, or www.lamama.org.

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nytheatre.com

We Couldn't Call it What We Wanted to Call it, So We Called it Holy Crap!!

Review Amy Lee Pearsall · April 29, 2011
Stephen Mo Hanan in a scene from <em>We Couldn't Call it What We Wanted to Call it, So We Called it Holy Crap!!</em>
Pictured: Stephen Mo Hanan in a scene from We Couldn't Call it What We Wanted to Call it, So We Called it Holy Crap!! (photo © Luigi Scorcia)

You know you’re in for an unorthodox theatre experience when going to see a play called We Couldn't Call It What We Wanted to Call It, So We Called It Holy Crap!! at La MaMa E.T.C.

With the assistance of co-translator and producer Ronald Rand, Spanish playwright Inigo Ramirez de Haro offers an English language translation of his controversial one-man tale of mental, physical, and spiritual constipation that inspired outrage and protest in Madrid in 2004.

Originally titled Me cago en Dios, a popular Spanish colloquialism with a somewhat inflammatory translation, the previous title better reflects the subject matter though both allude to the element of excreta.  The audience enters the house to find performer Stephen Mo Hanan sitting on a toilet on stage, where he proceeds to engage the audience in delightful improvised banter as everyone finds their seats.  An unnamed female swabs the stage with a mop and makes her way with her bucket up the main aisle; it is the last we see of her.  When the play itself finally begins, Hanan’s character confides that he wants nothing more than to have a bowel movement as it has been some time since he’s been able to produce.  After much hemming, hawing, and (yes) pushing, Hanan’s pants finally come back up with resignation and the layers of our protagonist’s story peel away as to how all this constipation began.

Scenic designer Stephen Dobay creates an understated world with elements of surrealism, outfitting the ramshackle bathroom with sheets of clear construction-grade plastic.  Hanan’s character tears each layer of plastic down and, as he does so, steps up and back into the recesses of the playing space.          The further he goes, the further we delve into his character’s mind and subconscious.

Hanan regresses to his character’s younger self, asking God for help with his math tests and promising not to step on any cracks.  Hanan then flips around to portray an angry, vengeful God who is only interested in casting aspersions and watching humanity from the comfort of his recliner.  The child becomes obsessed with ways he can win God’s love by proving his faith, but the church he turns to for salvation leads to his undoing.

Erica Gould directs the production with a deft hand. Hanan is quite enjoyable, though at times there did seem to be an excessive amount of whining when portraying his character’s younger self.  Composer-sound designer Scott O’Brien creates a perfectly maddening bit of Euro-Musak for the top of the show. Driscoll Otto’s lights are generally effective.

With this piece, Ramirez de Haro takes us solidly into the realm of Theatre of Cruelty and any comparisons he might win to Artaud are well earned.  Towards the end of the play, I found myself gripping my seat with eyes narrowed, and I could see how less restrained members of an audience—perhaps even those in Madrid several years ago—might become incensed by the proceedings.  If you are prepared to deal with acerbic bathroom humor, elements of religious indoctrination, and pedophilia in the Catholic Church, see …Holy Crap!! Otherwise, your bathroom meditations might be better saved for home.

Opened: May 5, 2011
Closes: May 15, 2011
Show Info
Synopsis: The U.S. premiere of a play by Inigo Ramirez de Haro whose original title in Spanish is "Me cago en Dios."
More Info...
Venue: La MaMa First Floor Theatre
Prices: $18.00
Students: $13.00
Seniors: $13.00
Ticketing Info
Online Ticketing
Box Office/Info: 212-475-7710
Tickets On Sale Thru: May 15, 2011
Performance Schedule:
Wed at 7:30pm
Thu at 7:30pm
Fri at 7:30pm
Sat at 7:30pm
Sun at 2:30pm
Artists Involved

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urban excavations

review: We Couldn’t Call It What We Wanted To Call It, So We Called It HOLY CRAP !!”
By Iñigo Ramirez de Haro

Translated by Iñigo Ramirez de Haro and Ronald Rand  
Directed by Erica Gould
Reviewed by Martha Wade Steketee  April 30, 2011

 

urban exStephen Mo Hanan. Photo by Luigi Scorcia.

Press materials and social media provide background on the play’s 2004 raucous original reception in Spain.  Protests in the theatre and on the streets inspired by the subject matter — pedophilia and the Catholic Church, amid other social wrongs.  Playwright Iñigo Ramirez de Haro collaborates here with actor and playwright Ronald Rand to translate his original work and bring it to a New York audience in this production at La Mama.  American audiences accustomed to stories of misdeeds by some Catholic clergy will not be shocked by the primary revelation in this one man show, nor by initial images of storyteller seated on one of two toilets on stage, attempting to evacuate — an action meant literally and physically and conceptually and dramatically.  What should draw audiences to this show is the journey of the storytelling, the focus of this performer, the pace of the revelations, the poetry and power of the theatrical gifts presented here.

A moldy smelling and dim basement passage way is our route into the performance space, past a mopping “janitor”, into a room being swept by a muttering “cleaning lady”.  Set design by Stephen Dobay includes covering sets with plastic sheeting the attendant removes upon request.  At one end of the room is a space marked with two by fours in a wall construction pattern (as if sheet rock were to be installed over them), and instead more plastic sheeting covers up, we are soon to see, layers of performance spaces that reflect deeper and deeper memories delivered by our host narrator over the hour of the performance  A middle-aged man (Stephen Mo Hanan) delivers memories of a pious child who is abused at home, taken advantage of at church, and makes some personal and professional life decisions.  Monologues are delivered in the voices of that pious child, of a young man, and of the authority figures who caused him harm.

This play may reflect one man grappling with his own memories, his own demons, his own sense-making.  Or it could be one man reporting stories he has learned in the confessional.  At times in this particular production, the stilted delivery of a recalled past event which may seem third-person generic and a bit off-putting, but the cumulative effect is winning.  You could imagine these stories being told by the man as a vessel, or as this man telling his own stories of pain and perhaps redemption.  I found myself comparing my reactions to this production with my reactions to an adaptation (by Jeffrey Fiske and Max McLean) of C.S. Lewis‘s The Screwtape Letters that has toured the country over the past few years and I saw in Chicago in 2008.  That play based on Lewis’s novel follows a devil Screwtape and his secretary (wordless vermin-like Toadpipe) as they train an off-stage demon Wormwood to undermine Christian faith. It’s a diatribe with some verbal pyrotechnics and devil-y magic.  Holy Crap, on the other hand, is human scale (toilets and references to constipation make it relentlessly human scale from the first moments) and takes us on a journey through violation and pain to redemption and faith through fear.  The combination is potent in a way that Screwtape’s religious tirade can never be.  I am haunted by my basement experience with this work in translation.

© Martha Wade Steketee (May 2, 2011)

 

At Urban Excavations website “What should draw audiences to this show is the journey of the storytelling, the focus of this performer, the pace of the revelations, the poetry and power of the theatrical gifts presented here… Holy Crap takes us on a journey through violation and pain to redemption and faith through fear.  The combination is potent in a way…I am haunted by my basement experience with this work in translation.” Martha Wade Steketee May 2, 2011.

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THE COMPANY

IÑIGO RAMIREZ DE HARO (Playwright/co-Translator) has had many plays staged in Europe, America and Africa including Today I Can’t Go to Work Because I’m in Love, Extinction, Your Weapon to Fight the Persevering Cellulite, Humanity is Ugly, Drunken-Bomb, History of a Winner, Do I Have to Die so That You Take Notice of Me?, I Wish You Were Dead, To Be Faithful in Congo is Not Easy, and The Duchess Goes Wild. He has also written many published articles and essays. His latest book, The Medina Sidonia Case, was a best-seller in Spain. Mr. Ramírez de Haro has received death threats for years.   www.RamirezdeHaro.com

STEPHEN MO HANAN* (Actor) appeared on Broadway in the original cast of Cats (Tony Award nomination), as Captain Hook opposite Cathy Rigby in Peter Pan, in The Pirates of Penzance with Kevin Kline, and in the London cast of Les Miserables as Thenardier. He also co-wrote and starred in the Off-Broadway musical Jolson & Co. He received a Carbonell Award from Florida's theater critics for his performance in A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum. He is the author of A Cat’s Diary, a first-hand account of the making of the legendary show (five stars at Amazon.com). His career as a street performer has spanned the globe from San Francisco to the roof of Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris.

RONALD RAND (Producer/co-Translator) In New York City, he has presented Exceptional Poets starring Ruby Dee, Dr. Hasna Muhammad, Sandy Rochelle, and Irene O’Garden; A Tribute to Harold Clurman & Robert Whitehead with Roy Scheider and Joseph Wiseman; An Evening with Vijay Tendelkar (India’s greatest playwright), Janis Stevens as Vivien Leigh, Cheer from Chawton: Jane Austin with Karen Eterovich, Libby Skala in LiLiA!, The Impossible H.L. Mencken with John Rothman, Andrea Reese in Cirque Jacqueline, Vinie Burrows as Rose McClendon, and new plays by Dale Wasserman and Ty Jones. As a playwright, Mr. Rand’s plays include LET IT BE ART!; The Group! (about the Group Theatre:  he directed a recent production at Pace University); Consequences, The Great Society, A System of Government; A River, A Seed, A Cloud, A Lamp, The Wind; Ode to the Moon; Ziz, King of the Birds; and IBSEN. Founder and publisher of “The Soul of the American Actor,” it is the only Newspaper in America dedicated to the art of the theater (12th year). Author of Acting Teachers of America (photos by Luigi Scorcia), editor for Jean-Claude van Italie’s memoirs, he is also co-screenwriter of The Group, an upcoming feature film about The Group Theatre with Joan Micklin Silver. Mr. Rand continues performing in his acclaimed solo play, LET IT BE ART! around the world, seen twice Off-Broadway, in 14 countries and 15 states, including London, Paris, Bangkok, Kathmandu, Zimbabwe, Turkey, Belarus, Buenos Aires, Paysundu, Athens. Upcoming: Kenya, Mozambique, Morocco, Cuba.  Adjunct Professor of Acting at Pace University, he has been a guest theatre professor at over 75 festivals, conferences, universities, and acting schools around the world. www.ClurmanThePlay.com, www.SoulAmericanActor.com.  

STEPHEN DOBAY (Scenic Design) Off B'way credits include The Affair in 22B (3STC) and Square Bubbles (Marble Productions). Other New York credits: The Beggar's Opera (Pace), Long Day's Journey into Night (York Shakespeare), The Pillowman (APAC). The Hurricane Katrina Comedy Festival, Saving Throw Versus Love (FringeNYC) Romeo and Juliet, A Streetcar Named Desire, The Seagull (Columbia Stages) Regional: Dublin by Lamplight (McCarter), Bus Stop (Olney Theatre) Hedwig and the Angry Inch (3STC). Opera: An Italian Girl in Algiers (Boston Midsummer Opera), The Play of Daniel (The Met/Cloisters), The Four Note Opera, Der Zwerg, L'Incoronazione di Poppea, and L’Heure Espagnole (OperaHub, Boston). MFA from the University of Washington and BA from Williams College. www.stephendobay.com

DRISCOLL OTTO (Lighting Design) Broadway: Associate Designer on Elf, After Miss Julie, Race and Rock of Ages. NY & Off-Bway: Nike: Step It Up( New Amsterdam), Long Day’s Journey into Night (Theatre Row) Shoshan Bean: A Happening (Lincoln Center Jazz) Wit and Wisdom (DTW) Twilight in Manchego & Rainbow Around the Sun (NYMF) I Have Loved Strangers (Ohio Theatre) Regional: The Drowsy Chaperone (Zach Scott Theatre) The Beauty Plays (Dallas Theatre Center) Ballroom with a Twist (Dupont Theatre/el portal Theatre) Flora The Red Menace, Once on This Island, & The Fantasticks (reprise), Hair,  25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee & Pete n’ Keely (Alpine Theatre Project) Showboat (Utah Festival Opera) Swing! & Violet (Plano Repertory Theatre) Don’t Dress for Dinner (Northern Stage) Figaro, The Cure at Troy, & Elektra (Brown/Trinity Rep. consortium) MFA NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts.  www.LoneStarNYC.com

COLLEEN M. SHERRY (Production Stage Manager) New York: Fela!, The Other Place (MCC), Circumcise Me, Roadkill Confidential & The Small (Clubbed Thumb), Tender Mercies (One Year Lease), How Now Dow Jones (FringeNYC ’09), Bone China (EST) and multiple productions at The Juilliard School including The Threepenny Opera, Othello, The Greeks, Le Nozze di Figaro & Burn This.  Benefit Galas for MCC, The Drama League & Broadway Cares / Equity Fights Aids.  Regional: Q2: Habitat (Rock Quarry in Stonington, Maine), The Corn Is Green & Wing It (Williamstown Theatre Festival), Kiss Me, Kate (Muhlenberg Summer Music Theatre).  Graduate of Muhlenberg College.

SCOTT O'BRIEN (Composer/Sound Designer) has designed and engineered theatre, dance and concert programs at Lincoln Center, Riverside Church, Theatre North Collaborative, American Stage Company, Centenary Stage, The Abingdon Theatre, George Street Playhouse and the World Financial Center. He has lectured at SUNY- Rockland (NY) and Montclair State University (NJ) and designed Arts in Education programming for the NJSCA. He was the Resident Sound Designer and Engineer for the Chautauqua Theater Company from 2006-2009 and has lectured at Pace University (NYC) on Sound Design for Theatre. Off-Broadway productions include: The Soldier Dreams100 Saints You Should Know, Eye of God, Fathers & Sons, The Vietnamization of New Jersey, Harvest, Like Batman, Missives and Prince Hal. New York Productions include: Three Sisters, Hamlet, MacBeth, Titus Andronicus, The Winters' Tale, Shannon in Ambient Light, Marat/Sade, Beyond Recognition, The Man who was Peter Pan, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Saving the Greeks, Kraken, The Importance of Being Earnest, Henry V, Fixing the Cat and The Merchant of Venice. Regional credits include: The Art of Coarse Acting, Blithe Spirit, On the Open Road, Inventing Montana, Scotland Road, The Innocents, Below the Belt, The Woman in Black, The Haunting of Hill House, The Killing of Sister George, The Cherry Orchard, The Just, Ah, Wilderness! and Monsieur Shaherazad. Film credits include: Eleanor; Godmother of American Fashion for Vanity Fair Films and Phoenix Rising; The Silent Victims Speak, an award-winning documentary for Noblevision Productions.  

KEVIN THACKER (Costume Designer) recent work includes: The Last Days of Judas Iscariot (Muhlenberg), Richard II and MacBeth (York Shakespeare NYC), Into the Woods, The Last Night of Ballyhoo (Fairleigh Dickinson), Romeo and Juliet, A Streetcar Named Desire, The Seagull (Columbia), Loves Labour's Lost, Shakespeare in Hollywood, Restoration Comedy, Marat Sade (Connecticut Repertory Theatre).  A former Weisfeld recipient he helped created and perform a mask and puppet version of The Selfish Giant at OISTATT's World Stage Design in Seoul, S. Korea which was rewarded the honor of World's Best Design Team.  His work can be seen at www.KThackerDesign.com

LAURA FAY LEWIS (Associate Artistic Producer) Published Poet, Musician, Singer/Songwriter, Award nominated Actor, Filmmaker, Screenwriter, Painter. Multi-media Artist A work in Progress.....The Juilliard School Theater Graduate. Founding and collaborating member of Tribeca Lab Theatre, played many leading and supporting roles in plays by Pirandello, Chekhov, Strindberg, and original works by resident playwrights and authors. Founding member of 2 NYC based rock bands The Dusty Diamonds, and The Blisstones. Performed in front of hundreds of thousands @ The Coney Island Mermaid Parade, The Halloween Parade and The GLBT Parade with The Blisstones. Curator for The Jungle Studios Multi-Media Center. Published Poetry in "Inspire The Muse" and "Lost Souls in A Fish Bowl". Nominated for Best Film Short and Best Actress at The Picture Start Film Festival also directed 3 music videos. Guest Artist with Green Bus Tour, Unitribe Productions, The Gershwin Hotel Tuesday Night Reading Series and The Indies Lab. Also the author of forthcoming film The Empty Handed Painter.

JOYCE MAIO (Artistic Development Producer) co-founded Paradoxe Casting in Hollywood before moving to NY in the mid 90’s to dedicate herself to the arts with an international focus. She was the NY Director of the New Association of Sephardi/Mizrahi Artists and Writers International, Program Manager of the American Friends of the Ludwig Foundation of Cuba and Grant Manager at the Laura Pels Foundation. She has organized various festivals in NY to include the 4th Havana Film Festival in NY and the 8th Latino Cultural Festival. As marketing and public relations consultant, she participated in Act French Festival with the off-Broadway play Hilda by award-winning author Marie Ndiaye and the Dream-Up Festival with London-based Pascal Theatre for The Dybbuk.

ELLEN STEWART founded La MaMa in 1961 in a tiny basement on Manhattan's Lower East Side. She dedicated it to the playwright and all aspects of the theater. Today, La MaMa is a world-renowned cultural institution recognized as the seedbed of new work by artists of all nations and cultures. To date, La MaMa has presented artists from over 70 nations. Each season, over 100 productions with over 400 performances are staged in their three theaters. Among those artists who began at La MaMa include: Meredith Monk, Robert Wilson, Jean-Claude van-Itallie, Harvey Fierstein, Tan Dun, Joel Zwick, Mike Figgis, Jackie Curtis, Blue Man Group, John Kelly, David and Amy Sedaris. La MaMa has been honored with over thirty Obie Awards, Drama Desk Awards, Bessie Awards and Villager Awards. www.lamama.org.

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FOR THE PRESS

The photographs below are in high resolution, 300 dpi for press use. Click with the right mouse button and Save Target As to download to your computer.

Stephen Mo Hanan in Holy Crap Stephen_Mo_Hanan-bars1.jpg
photo of Steven Mo Hanan by Luigi Scorcia photo of Steven Mo Hanan by Luigi Scorcia
INIGO-PLAY-Stephen-Mo-Hanan.jpg Stephen Mo Hanan bars2
photo of Steven Mo Hanan photo of Steven Mo Hanan by Luigi Scorcia

 

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